New Recruits

The Department of National Defence is looking to hire, but don’t pack your bags just yet. They’re not interested in you.

The military has a specific type of trooper in mind…

Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake, a training centre for the air force in North-Eastern Alberta, has hired a new battalion—of goats.

The four-legged recruits chomp on weeds and keep the airfields clear. More efficient and more effective than humans at working steep and swampy terrain, the animals seek and destroy…and eat.

The herd of 250 animals spend their days chewing and their nights in a paddock. “The name of the game at an airfield like Cold Lake,” says Captain Mathew Strong, “is to keep the vegetation low and prevent other animals from taking up residence.”

No weed-whackers, no uniforms required.

Aimer at Amazon

Going It Alone

I own a sweatshirt that says…

While it’s true that life is full of rough spots you have to traverse with care, the closest I’ve come to portaging is wheeling my luggage through an airport. Actually hiking through forests hoisting a canoe over my head? That would be a NO.

Zev Heuer has no problem with portages. The fifteen-year-old took his canoe, and his dog, and paddled his way across Alberta and Saskatchewan to his summer job at Churchill River Canoe Outfitters.

Karsten Heuer

It took him two months. Two months of paddling during the day, finding shelter, and setting up camp at night—by himself.

Two months.

According to Zev, “One of the things that’s pretty amazing about Canada is how everything’s connected by water.”

Karsten Heuer

And when it’s not, there is always portage…

Karsten Heuer

Zev is way more Canadian than I will ever be. Our Coureur de Bois ancestors would be proud.

Aimer at Amazon

Human Rights

A simple phrase, the meaning fairly jumps out at you. No explanation necessary—or not.

In recent weeks, former employees have gone public with allegations of racism and homophobia levelled against the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

The museum’s mandate claims it is “centred around the idea that respect and understanding of human rights can serve as a positive force for change in the world.”

Understanding implies knowledge, and for two years from 2015 to 2017, the museum adopted a don’t ask, don’t tell policy when conducting certain tours. At the behest of some schools, the museum staff was told to excise specific exhibits from their guided tours.

I’d give you two guesses as to what those exhibits were, but you only need one—LGBTQ content.

Staff members were asked to steer the students away from any displays that mentioned diverse sexual orientation or gender identity. They were told to stand in front of a same-sex marriage exhibit blocking it from the students’ view.

That this conspiracy of silence was even considered, much less condoned for over two years at a museum purporting to encourage dialogue about human rights—all human rights—is disheartening. One more example of how far we still have to go as human beings.

Note: The CEO has resigned and the museum has issued an apology. They no longer adapt any of their education programs at the request of schools.

Aimer at Amazon

Gentleman Jack

Guilty.

I’m cheating on Netflix with Amazon Prime and Crave.

Netflix holds my heart, true, but…to quote Oscar Wilde, a man who knew what he was talking about, “I can resist anything except temptation.

I’m a weak person, lured away from my true love by Tim Roth in Tin Star winking at me from Amazon Prime. Tempted by Nathan Lane in City of Angels calling out to me from Crave. Seduced by Suranne Jones in Gentleman Jack smirking at me on Crave.

In my defence, I didn’t intend to cheat. I was just looking, you know, the way you do…

Top hat?

I stopped scrolling.

—For reasons I’m sure I don’t want to look at too closely, top hats get my attention, tuxedos too. Doesn’t matter which sex is wearing them, remember Julie Andrews in Victor/Victoria?—

Top hat. I hit select.

Funny thing about guilt, the more you cheat, the less it bothers you. Fortunate, that, because I’ll be cheating until the very last episode of Gentleman Jack.

Set in 1832, Halifax, West Yorkshire, Gentleman Jack is a period piece with a twist. That twist is Ann Lister. From the first scene, from the minute she drops the reins, jumps down from a public coach she’s not supposed to be driving, and strides onto the screen, you’re hooked.

Ann’s who we all want to be, if we were only stronger, smarter, braver.

Did I mention she wears a top hat?

Tempted?

Aimer at Amazon

Family Pride

Too freaking hot. Too many people. Glen much preferred to watch Pride from the comfort of his living room. He was too old for—Hello, someone’s been working out. Glen eyed the young man shouting into a microphone atop the float rolling down Yonge Street. Nice. When was the last time your abs looked like that, huh? Never.

He wouldn’t be standing shoulder-to-shoulder with half of Toronto if it wasn’t for his nephew. No, not fair, this wasn’t Tony’s idea. This was his sister’s fault. Blasted Type A personality. When Tony came out a few months back, Karen couldn’t leave it at we-love-you, use-a-condom. Nope, she had to join PFLAG, and volunteer with EGALE, and drag the whole family down to Pride. Overkill.

Not that he didn’t support his nephew, he did, but Tony didn’t need his family here. Somewhere between the parking lot and Yonge Street, he’d disappeared into a gang of his friends and more power to him. Glen wouldn’t mind ducking into the nearest pub for something cold himself. Beer on his mind, he tried to wedge himself out of the crowd and stepped back—onto someone else. “Sorry.”

“No problem.” The guy moved back, clearing a few inches for Glen. “Bit tight in here.”

“Yeah.” Glen shifted to the side, but the crowd surged forward and he found himself chest to chest with the stranger he’d stepped on. Green eyes bracketed by age lines, sunglasses set atop waves of grey hair. Lucky bastard. Glen was not okay with his own shrinking hairline.

“Had enough?” The grey head nodded at the crowd.

“Too old for this.” Glenn winnowed his way through the glut of bodies, aware of the stranger at his back.

“Me too,” Grey Mop said, as they reached the relative quiet of a store front. “Only came to support my son.”

“Nephew. Married?”

“Divorced.”

“Beer?”

“Hell, yes.”

Too old for Pride? Maybe not.