Optimisim

Politics isn’t something I delve into here, but I had to pass on this ironic prayer from the brilliant mind of E. I. Wong. I’m thinking it should be titled, “Clean Slate” 🙂

A Narcissist Writes Letters, To Himself

Wouldn’t it be wonderful
if Democrats and Republicans
set aside their differences
& came together under one roof

& then, due to decades
of neglectful infrastructure funding policy,
erosion collapsed that roof?

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Reconsider

When I started this blog, I decided to only write about writing. I didn’t want to be one of those people blabbing about the insanely boring details of their life. Also, I wasn’t sure how much of myself I wanted to put out there in Web Space.
After reading Phoebe Quinn’s post below, I may have to rethink my position 🙂

by Phoebe Quinn Six year-old me dreamed of seeing my name shining on hardbacks in the window of Waterstone’s as the latest bestselling debut author. Twenty-seven year old me has altered the dream slightly to a single webpage with the all-important average customer rating hovering between 4 and 5. It’s less enchanting, but more […]

via Has Self-Publishing Made Everything a Bit…Sterile? — A Writer’s Path

On Writing With a Purpose

According to Meg Dowell, knowing why we write can help keep us writing. To paraphrase Meg, our reason is our inspiration. Nice theory. I like it. Makes sense.
The only problem is I don’t know why I write… It can’t just be vanity, right? That would be sad 😦
It’s an interesting question. Why do you write, do you know?
Check out Meg’s article.

A Writer's Path

writing pen judge



by Meg Dowell

You likely learned in school that writing an essay begins with defining your target audience and purpose for reaching out to them. We all wrote that essay about whether or not our school should or shouldn’t have uniforms (did schools who already had uniforms still argue this?). Audience: school board. Purpose: convince the authority figures that we should or should not all dress alike.

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When to Ignore Negative Feedback — A Writer’s Path

If you’ve ever had to nurse an ego bleeding from a nasty review, this post by Tonya Moore is an excellent bandage 🙂

by Tonya R. Moore I think we call all agree that getting feedback on our writing is very important. Most of the time—whether it’s positive or negative, feedback serves to encourage or help us grow. We can learn a lot from negative feedback but this isn’t always the case. Sometimes it makes more sense […]

via When to Ignore Negative Feedback — A Writer’s Path

Crazy

You know that promise you make to yourself? When you swear you will never do this  (behaviour of choice) again, ever? And then, of course, you do it again. Crazy, right?

Some time about the middle of my last book, I told myself never again. I sucked, no one was ever going to read my books anyway, why was I putting myself through this … you know the rant.

Done. Finished. Over.

A secondary character whispered to me. Wisps of scenes and conversations tantalized and teased and …  (insert faourite expletive here)!!!

Okay, not over. Not done.

I’m writing book two in a trilogy. Crazy? Yes.

I’ve gone crazy and I won’t be back anytime soon.

But this is it. This trilogy — which at the moment amounts to a whole 400 words followed by no freaking idea — and I’m done. Really 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

A Little Blood