Mistaken Identity

What’s in a name? Shakespeare notwithstanding, a whole hell of a lot.

Aimer Boyz is my pen name. It means To Love Boys. I thought it was a natural fit for someone who writes M/M romance, but I’m just now realizing as I write this that translated into English… it makes me sound like a pedophile. Crap. Crap. Crap.

Not only did I choose a rather questionable name,  but I compounded the error by deciding that a picture of two men kissing would be the perfect feature image for this blog. In my defense, I thought the picture said, “Hey, this is what I write.”

A picture, like any art form, speaks through the person who views it. While I thought the image of two men was a clear representation of my genre,  some visitors to my blog assumed it was a clear representation of me. Some were annoyed when they found out I was not who they thought I was.

I do not post my picture here, I do not use my real name. I’m not trying to deceive anyone, I merely want my words to stand on their own.

I apologize to anyone who might have felt duped. It was not my intention.

Tonight, I changed my feature image to something that is hopefully more innocuous. Obviously, I still have a lot to learn about blogging.

Please tell me I’m not the only one who’s screwed up 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

 

 

 

 

Are You in Your Books?

It’s inevitable. It’s not always a conscious act on the author’s part, but it’s always the end result. Bits and pieces of the author find their way into their characters. This character’s favourite ice cream,  that character’s  height, eye colour, sleeping habits, exercise routine. All the personality quirks that make a fictional person feel real? They work because they are stolen from a real person, usually the author.

This is as true on the larger scale as it is on the small. Is the space alien an atheist, does the vampire support transgender rights, does the fictional mom running car pool in suburbia support legalized euthanasia? The answer lies in the author’s own belief system, in the author’s concept of morality.

There are also times when an author can be seen through a character that expresses the exact opposite of the author’s own feelings and beliefs.

At the base of all fiction is a kernel of non-fiction and that kernel comes from the author. No matter how dystopian, futuristic, or paranormal the novel, it is that basis of real that makes it read as true. Bits and pieces of the author filtered through their characters make the book authentic.

Case in point: The fact I write about Vampires says something about me 🙂

Are you in your books?

Aimer at Amazon

Optimisim

Politics isn’t something I delve into here, but I had to pass on this ironic prayer from the brilliant mind of E. I. Wong. I’m thinking it should be titled, “Clean Slate” 🙂

A Narcissist Writes Letters, To Himself

Wouldn’t it be wonderful
if Democrats and Republicans
set aside their differences
& came together under one roof

& then, due to decades
of neglectful infrastructure funding policy,
erosion collapsed that roof?

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Reconsider

When I started this blog, I decided to only write about writing. I didn’t want to be one of those people blabbing about the insanely boring details of their life. Also, I wasn’t sure how much of myself I wanted to put out there in Web Space.
After reading Phoebe Quinn’s post below, I may have to rethink my position 🙂

by Phoebe Quinn Six year-old me dreamed of seeing my name shining on hardbacks in the window of Waterstone’s as the latest bestselling debut author. Twenty-seven year old me has altered the dream slightly to a single webpage with the all-important average customer rating hovering between 4 and 5. It’s less enchanting, but more […]

via Has Self-Publishing Made Everything a Bit…Sterile? — A Writer’s Path

On Writing With a Purpose

According to Meg Dowell, knowing why we write can help keep us writing. To paraphrase Meg, our reason is our inspiration. Nice theory. I like it. Makes sense.
The only problem is I don’t know why I write… It can’t just be vanity, right? That would be sad 😦
It’s an interesting question. Why do you write, do you know?
Check out Meg’s article.

A Writer's Path

writing pen judge



by Meg Dowell

You likely learned in school that writing an essay begins with defining your target audience and purpose for reaching out to them. We all wrote that essay about whether or not our school should or shouldn’t have uniforms (did schools who already had uniforms still argue this?). Audience: school board. Purpose: convince the authority figures that we should or should not all dress alike.

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When to Ignore Negative Feedback — A Writer’s Path

If you’ve ever had to nurse an ego bleeding from a nasty review, this post by Tonya Moore is an excellent bandage 🙂

by Tonya R. Moore I think we call all agree that getting feedback on our writing is very important. Most of the time—whether it’s positive or negative, feedback serves to encourage or help us grow. We can learn a lot from negative feedback but this isn’t always the case. Sometimes it makes more sense […]

via When to Ignore Negative Feedback — A Writer’s Path