Bereft

I’m in mourning, devasted.

It’s over.

I’ve seen all 20 episodes of Netflix’s Vincenzo.

netflix.fandom.com

I didn’t expect to become addicted to this tongue-in-cheek mafia-inspired drama. While Vincenzo starts off with a bang…

It devolves into silly secondary plotlines and odd-ball characters eking out a living in Geumga Plaza. Comic relief? Maybe, but I didn’t find them funny.

I was ready to give up on Vincenzo about four episodes in, but perving on a good looking actor isn’t a bad way to kill thirty minutes on the treadmill.

And then…

Murder and mayhem. White-collar criminals with blood on their hands. Corporate greed and political corruption. Betrayal and Mafia-style revenge.

As episode built on episode, I started to appreciate the style of the show, the differences between this Korean crime story and the American versions I’m more familiar with.

Two words: dramatic, romantic.

Sweeping shots and grand entrances. Slow motion and a gazillion close ups. The lead actors, Song Joong-ki and Jeon Yeo-been, dressed to kill in great suits and designer sunglasses beat the hell out of Tony Soprano in his bathrobe, chomping on a cigar.

A relationship builds between the two leads, and builds, and builds—and no one gets naked. Cue the close ups and the lingering glances. Vincenzo and Hong Cha-yeong don’t share a meaningful embrace until the final episode…

How am I going to climb on the treadmill tomorrow without this show to make the effort slightly more appealing?

Aimer at Amazon

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