Mystery Men

Ahead of the curve —Two men tie the knot in 1957.

The ONE Archives Foundation in Los Angeles, a non-profit dedicated to preserving LGBTQ history, is on a mission. Having stumbled across a series of wedding pictures taken in the 1950’s, they want to find the grooms or, at least, find out who they are. 

So far, all they know is that the pictures were dropped off at a drugstore in Philadelphia to be developed and that the owner of the drugstore, deeming them inappropriate, refused to return them to the unknown grooms.

To that end, they’ve created a website, OurOneStory.com to help find these men. Not an easy task as the couple must be in their 80’s or 90’s now. The historians have become sleuths, hoping that if they spread these pictures around someone will recognize either the grooms or their guests.

Incredible to think that this little chunk of history has survived, that these pictures have somehow made it from Philadelphia to Los Angeles, and that they weren’t destroyed by the offended drugstore owner.

Also, in your face to all those morons who picket and scream and fight against school boards who want to “normalize” homosexuality. The cretins who rant about the corrupting influence of social media, who insist the liberal agenda is destroying family values and “turning” good kids gay.

These two men knew who they were, and who they wanted, and I’m pretty sure they didn’t learn that in school, or see it in an Instagram post.

Captured in black and white, a celebration, a moment in time, and a silent witness to the fact that same-sex attraction is, and always has been, one of the threads that inform the tapestry of human sexuality.

Sorry, stepping down from my soapbox now. For more wedding pictures, please check out this link.

Aimer at Amazon

And the Truth Will Set You Free

Maybe, maybe not, but it will really piss off your wife.

After six years of marriage, a husband came out to his wife in Cape Town, South Africa. Apparently, this woman didn’t get the memo. In cases like this, which by the way, wouldn’t happen if society was a little less judgmental, the protocol is clear:

“Why didn’t you tell me?”, “How long have you known?”, and “Are you okay?” are pretty much standard responses, followed by, “What do we do now?”

Has this woman even seen a Rom-Con in the last twenty years?

Nowhere in the Hollywood rule book does it say to sue you husband for being gay. To demand $600,000 for “emotional pain,” “psychological trauma,” and “financial prejudice.”

Nowhere does it say to drag the intimate details of your husband’s journey to accepting himself through the court.

The High Court Judge, obviously familiar with the concept of human compassion, threw the case out of court.

Amen.

Aimer at Amazon

It Takes a Village

The old adage, It takes a village to raise a child, has never been more true than now.

Graeme and Simon Berney-Edwards of Redhill, Surrey, England are the proud fathers of two-year-old twins. They have the family they always wanted, but it wasn’t easy and they didn’t get there on their own.

Picture submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News.

The first step in their journey to fatherhood took them to an in vitro fertilization clinic in Las Vegas and eggs from an anonymous donor.

Step two had the couple looking to Canada for a surrogate, Canadian laws governing surrogacy being more progressive than those in the U.K.

Enter Meg Stone of Hamilton, Ontario. Meg was up for the challenge of carrying twins, half-siblings, one fathered by Graeme, one by Simon.

All in all, it took two women and two men across three countries to make the Berney-Edwards dream of a family come true.

Submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News

It takes a village 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Pigment Light

Raccoons: Masked creatures who lurk around your house waiting for a chance to take the lid off your garbage can. Easily recognizable for their prison stripes— or not.

One out of every ten thousand raccoons is born with a genetic mutation that strips them of their black and grey signature colouring. Your chance of seeing an albino raccoon in the wild is about the same as being struck by lightning, 1 in 750,000.

Martin Ouellette is luckier than most, he not only saw one albino raccoon, he saw two— in his backyard.

Martin Quellette/Churchwood Pictures

Ouellette, watching the family of critters who’ve developed a liking for his oak tree, noticed that the regulation-coloured raccoons are protective of their lighter skinned brethren.

Protective, as if they know their lighter-skinned brethren can’t hide as easily as they can. Protective, as if they don’t care about a little pigmentation, or lack thereof.

Shameful, and sad, but often true, animals are more humane than we are.

Aimer at Amazon

Long Lost

A Cambridge University student, while doing research on the British poet Siegfried Sassoon, has found buried treasure. A poem penned to Sassoon’s boyfriend, Glen Byam Shaw.

Written in 1925, when homosexuality was still a crime in the U.K., perhaps the omission of pronouns is more than a matter of poetic style.

Not a blast from the past, but a sigh…

Untitled poem
Though you have left me, I’m not yet alone:
For what you were befriends the firelit room;
And what you said remains & is my own
To make a living gladness of my gloom
The firelight leaps & shows your empty chair
And all our harmonies of speech are stilled:
But you are with me in the voiceless air
My hands are empty, but my heart is filled.
Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Aimer at Amazon

Pride

As Toronto gears up for the Pride parade this weekend, I’ve been hearing a lot about a group who feel left out, overlooked. Apparently, these people have been victimized by those of us who strive for an inclusive society with equality for all.

They’re asking for their own parade, calling it STRAIGHT PRIDE. How they can even say the words with a straight face is beyond me!

Not that I’m surprised, we’ve heard this kind of garbage before, white men complaining about how rough they have it because minorities and women are getting all the good jobs. Please! Pass the hat, let’s help these poor souls out.

There are a lot of comments out there on the request for a Straight Pride parade in Boston. Here’s one of my favourites:

Will a Straight Pride parade ever happen? I’m thinking not, but the fact that some people think it should… There are still a few holdouts who believe the earth is flat, doesn’t make them right.

Aimer at Amazon

A Lifetime

Is it the same?

After all this time, are we the same?

I don’t know. How would I know? How can I compare who we are now with who we were then…?

The years rolled on, shit happened. Evasions. Lies. Large and small hurts delivered in anger and in silence.

Shared memories and secret smiles. Mornings rushing around or sleeping in. Frenzied days and wild nights. Laughter … I don’t have to try to remember the laughter because we laugh still you and I.

I wasn’t looking to get married all those years ago, not that we could back then. I was looking to get laid and so were you…

And here we are, forty years on. Thinning hair, and rounding shoulders, and still looking to each other—to get laid.