For Your Viewing Pleasure

Back when televisions looked like this…

Photo by Huu1ef3nh u0110u1ea1t on Pexels.com

There weren’t a lot of channels to choose from. Everyone watched the same shows, at the same time. No spoiler alerts necessary.

When Roots aired in 1977, people stayed home, glued to their sets. There were no recording devices, no pause option on your remote control—no remote control.

Now, when televisions look like this…

leslievillegeek.com

We have options aplenty. Between local stations, cable networks, and streaming services we are bombarded with choice.

Now, when technology allows us to talk to our televisions, we don’t actually need them. We can watch whatever we want, whenever we want, where ever we want. On our phones, our tablets, our laptops. A continuous loop of news and entertainment 24/7.

So, how is it possible to spend forty-five minutes scrolling through the onscreen guide, hopping back and forth between Netflix, Amazon Prime, Crave, and Disney+ and still complain that there’s…

NOTHING TO WATCH!

Aimer at Amazon

The New Dune

If anyone had asked, I would have voted no on remaking Dune.

Okay, yes, the worm could use a CGI update, and I wouldn’t mind a less pestilent, blimp of a baron, but Kyle MacLachlan did a fine job as Paul Atreides. No need to fix what’s not broken—

Say what?

Timothée Chalamet?

Timothée Chalamet from Call Me by Your Name?

Chalamet is the new Paul Atreides?

Can I change my vote?

Coming to a theatre near you—providing we’ve all had our shots, and the movie theatres are safe again—October 1, 2021.

Until then,

you’ll have to settle for this

Paul Atreides action figure.

Amazon won’t deliver Timothée. I asked.

Aimer at Amazon

#Set!

Photo by Gary Barnes on Pexels.com

Thanks to Covid, we’re all eating at home these days. Usually, in front of the television.

It’s only a memory now, but there was a time when we could invite people over for dinner. When we set the table with real plates not paper. When we bothered to set the table at all.

There’s an art to setting a table, to creating an atmosphere that says, “Welcome, enjoy, eat.” A creative component that has been celebrated in competitions at county fairs for decades.

Yes, competitive table-setting, or tablescaping, is a thing—who knew?

Scott Gawlik.

Toronto Star

The director of Set!, a tablescaping documentary that screened at Toronto’s Hot Docs Festival this year.

My table will never meet competitive standards—Judges frown on paper napkins and wrinkled tablecloths—and I’m good with that.

Who needs a little blue ribbon when you can have family sitting around the table, dripping sauce all over the tablecloth, and dropping food on the floor?

Aimer at Amazon

#Incubus: A Noir Experience

I was warned.

Right there in the book blurb, printed in italics so you couldn’t miss it: There are no truly happy endings in Noir.

Did I heed the warning, did I even understand it? No.

If I had paid more attention to the author’s alert—”for mature readers who enjoy the darkness and moral ambiguity of noir stories.”

If I’d been less intrigued by the line—”Cole fell for the suave Leo Mancini the day they met, but is it ever really possible to trust a liar—especially when Mancini makes a murder suggestion sound like a marriage proposal?”

I would have missed not just a beautifully crafted story, but a visceral experience.

Dark?

Yes, yes, and God, yes.

Leighton Greene spins you into a roller-coaster of a ride. Hurtles you through a tunnel of deceit and deception, lies and liars, and dumps you into an inescapable pit of despair. The ending stays with you, and the more you think about it, the worse it gets until you’re curled up under the covers, telling yourself that it’s only fiction.

Happy? No.

The most well-written, absorbing, provocative book I’ve read in years? Yes.

Incubus. Read it, if you dare.

Aimer at Amazon

Monday

Photo by Tara Winstead on Pexels.com

As anyone who has ever dieted knows, Monday’s the day.

The day you kick a lifetime of bad habits out the door, and usher in the new and improved you.

The day you pop out of bed, hit the treadmill and the shower, and get it together…all of it, everything on that DIY improvement list in your head.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

The only problem with Monday is, there’s always another one coming along 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Post Covid: Scary

Now that the vaccines are out and about, and we’re impatiently awaiting the end of pandemic restrictions, have you put any thought into a post-Covid world, and what that might look like?

I’ve wondered if masks might become a permanent part of my wardrobe, if the Western handshake will be replaced by the Eastern bow, if my poor neglected passport will ever escape the drawer its imprisoned in, but that’s as far as it went.

Until today.

In the kitchen, baking cookies I had no business baking, I saw it—our post-Covid world.

You’ve seen it too, in all its HD clarity.

Touchstone Pictures 2009

It’s been awhile since 2009 so you might not remember, but the movie ends with people stumbling out of their houses, blinking in the daylight most of them haven’t seen in years. Unshaven, unwashed, wrapped in bathrobes, they’re lost in a world they’re no longer familiar with.

Scary?

OMG, Yes! Have you seen my robe?

FYI, the cookies came out pretty well 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Third Time’s the Charm

While I’m not a big believer in proverbs and folk wisdom, I hope the above saying is true.

After a year of bad and worse news, we could all use a little luck.

Heading into the third wave of Crippling Covid, and yet another lockdown here in Ontario, I have to say I’m feeling a little hopeless, and helpless, and tired.

Yes, the vaccines are rolling out, and the news broadcasts report light at the end of the tunnel, but I’m wondering …

When the storm is over, just how big and bright is that rainbow going to be?

Aimer at Amazon

Small, Smaller, Smallest

Humans are fascinated by the rare, the strange, and the extreme. The tallest man, the oldest woman, the largest pumpkin. Add the suffix est and you can sell tickets.

Personally, and probably because I’m knee high to a grasshopper myself, I like small. Miniature shoes, tea cups, Disney’s Tinker Bell. Shrink anything down small enough and it’s adorable.

Almost anything.

A German-Madagascan expedition team has discovered what they believe to be the smallest reptile on earth. The Brookesia Nana or nano-chameleon’s total length, from nose to tail, is just under 22 mm (0.87 “).

Tiny, yes, but cute? Not so much.

Frank Glaw

Nothing like this guy…

geico.com

Now, that’s adorable. For a lizard.

Aimer at Amazon

Covid 2.0

Here we are, living the sequel to a movie we never wanted to be in.

Covid 2.0

Social distancing, masks, quarantines, lockdowns, not to mention the parents battling with online learning, the people forced into unemployment, the gruesome ICU statistics, and the ever present threat of contracting this nasty little virus.

Yeah, fun times. Now, imagine this…

Imagine living through a pandemic, not once, but twice.

Born in 1911, in Lauder, Manitoba, Jemima Westcott was seven years old when the Spanish Flu struck in 1918. There was no social distancing back then, no vaccine, and the schools stayed open. Jemima remembers having to douse her handkerchief in eucalyptus oil which was thought to be both a preventative and a cure. 55,000 Canadians lost their lives to that plague, but Jemima’s family and their farming community escaped the worst of it.

Last Sunday, on January 10th, Jemima celebrated her 110th birthday, making her Manitoba’s oldest resident and one of Canada’s supercentenarians.

Jemima with her granddaughter, Raunora. (submitted by Raunora Westcott)

A retired teacher, mother to five, and grandmother to fifteen, Jemima is once again waiting out a pandemic. To keep in touch with the family who can’t visit now, Jemima has learned to make video calls.

Jemima’s advice for a long life?

“Be yourself, and enjoy it.”

Aimer at Amazon

Mr. Perfect

Bitmoji Image

Don’t tell anyone, but my husband is better at Covid than I am.

I reach for a cookie, he does sit-ups. I bake brownies, he gets on the treadmill. I veg out in front of the television, and he’s downstairs practicing his golf swing.

I get bored, and eat. He gets bored, and cranks out a set of push-ups.

After almost a year of sheltering in place, I’m a mess, and he’s in better shape than ever.

Freaking annoying!

Can you divorce someone for being perfect?

Aimer at Amazon