Let There Be Light

Despite the ever-encroaching Delta Variant, the deluded anti-vaxers, and vitriolic protestors, we’re learning how to live in a Covid world.

Vaccine passports in hand, we’re heading back into restaurants, movie theatres, and airports.

There’s light at the end of the tunnel or…hanging from the ceiling.

Laura Weiss

Laura Weiss, a Colorado nurse, crafted this stunning chandelier from the empty Covid-19 vaccine vials that piled up as her community stepped up, and rolled up their sleeves.

An expression of hope and celebration, The Light of Appreciation is an homage to the health-care workers who delivered the shots and all the people who chose to get them.

Laura Weiss

Let there be light…Please.

Aimer at Amazon

9,000 Kilometres

My daughter said it was easy. She said I could do it.

She was fifteen; I wasn’t.

Buckling myself into a pair of inline rollerblades, I gave it the old college try—more like a high school hope—and stumbled my way along the sidewalk.

Apparently, to learn to skate you have to take chances, you have to be okay with screwing up, with falling. Yeah, no.

I never even made it all the way around the block.

Zach Choboter made it 9,000 kilometres, from Whistler, British Columbia to St. John’s, Newfoundland.

CBC NEWS

Zach ended his cross-country trip with a dip in the Atlantic Ocean and a Guiness World Record for the longest journey on rollerblades.

Me?

Still can’t blade. Still wish I could.

Aimer at Amazon

Flaunt It

The people in my life are getting annoyed.

I’m not all that happy myself.

Covid has been an excellent excuse, but I’ve just been postponing the inevitable. Waiting for…what? A sign from on high?

If so, I found it. Courtesy of Gian-Paolo Mendoza and CBC News.

Ruzzelle Gasmen, a speech pathologist in British Columbia, just might be the incentive I need. Ruzzelle, who deals with a hearing loss herself, has done the impossible. She’s turned hearing aids into a fashion statement.

Gian-Paolo Mendoza/CBC

Drawing from the culture and style of her Filipino heritage, Ruzzelle makes hearing aid accessories.

Jewelry for hearing aids?

Yes.

Gian-Paolo Mendoza/CBC

The above design, Ruzzelle’s first, is based on the ear cuff worn by Catriona Gray, the Filipino Miss Universe pageant winner in 2018.

Ruzzelle makes each piece by hand and is planning on donating a portion of all proceeds to a Wavefront Centre program that provides refurbished hearing aids to people in need.

Why hide that little piece of plastic when you can FLAUNT IT?

Aimer at Amazon

They’re Back.

The strangest thing…

In my backyard last week, just me, the clouds, and the trees—

There may have been a laptop, cell phone, latte, the occasional squirrel, and a yard full of weeds where grass should be, but let’s not worry about the details—

Into the quiet of swaying branches, twittering birds, and the neighbour’s child screaming in the pool next door…the muted, rumbling roar of an engine above.

A sound I hadn’t heard in oh, eighteen months.

Slicing through the clouds, sliding across the sky, metal wings.

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

A sight once so common that only children looked up in awe, now a little startling.

Oh, right, a plane.

Aimer at Amazon

For Your Viewing Pleasure

Back when televisions looked like this…

Photo by Huu1ef3nh u0110u1ea1t on Pexels.com

There weren’t a lot of channels to choose from. Everyone watched the same shows, at the same time. No spoiler alerts necessary.

When Roots aired in 1977, people stayed home, glued to their sets. There were no recording devices, no pause option on your remote control—no remote control.

Now, when televisions look like this…

leslievillegeek.com

We have options aplenty. Between local stations, cable networks, and streaming services we are bombarded with choice.

Now, when technology allows us to talk to our televisions, we don’t actually need them. We can watch whatever we want, whenever we want, where ever we want. On our phones, our tablets, our laptops. A continuous loop of news and entertainment 24/7.

So, how is it possible to spend forty-five minutes scrolling through the onscreen guide, hopping back and forth between Netflix, Amazon Prime, Crave, and Disney+ and still complain that there’s…

NOTHING TO WATCH!

Aimer at Amazon

The New Dune

If anyone had asked, I would have voted no on remaking Dune.

Okay, yes, the worm could use a CGI update, and I wouldn’t mind a less pestilent, blimp of a baron, but Kyle MacLachlan did a fine job as Paul Atreides. No need to fix what’s not broken—

Say what?

Timothée Chalamet?

Timothée Chalamet from Call Me by Your Name?

Chalamet is the new Paul Atreides?

Can I change my vote?

Coming to a theatre near you—providing we’ve all had our shots, and the movie theatres are safe again—October 1, 2021.

Until then,

you’ll have to settle for this

Paul Atreides action figure.

Amazon won’t deliver Timothée. I asked.

Aimer at Amazon

#Set!

Photo by Gary Barnes on Pexels.com

Thanks to Covid, we’re all eating at home these days. Usually, in front of the television.

It’s only a memory now, but there was a time when we could invite people over for dinner. When we set the table with real plates not paper. When we bothered to set the table at all.

There’s an art to setting a table, to creating an atmosphere that says, “Welcome, enjoy, eat.” A creative component that has been celebrated in competitions at county fairs for decades.

Yes, competitive table-setting, or tablescaping, is a thing—who knew?

Scott Gawlik.

Toronto Star

The director of Set!, a tablescaping documentary that screened at Toronto’s Hot Docs Festival this year.

My table will never meet competitive standards—Judges frown on paper napkins and wrinkled tablecloths—and I’m good with that.

Who needs a little blue ribbon when you can have family sitting around the table, dripping sauce all over the tablecloth, and dropping food on the floor?

Aimer at Amazon

#Incubus: A Noir Experience

I was warned.

Right there in the book blurb, printed in italics so you couldn’t miss it: There are no truly happy endings in Noir.

Did I heed the warning, did I even understand it? No.

If I had paid more attention to the author’s alert—”for mature readers who enjoy the darkness and moral ambiguity of noir stories.”

If I’d been less intrigued by the line—”Cole fell for the suave Leo Mancini the day they met, but is it ever really possible to trust a liar—especially when Mancini makes a murder suggestion sound like a marriage proposal?”

I would have missed not just a beautifully crafted story, but a visceral experience.

Dark?

Yes, yes, and God, yes.

Leighton Greene spins you into a roller-coaster of a ride. Hurtles you through a tunnel of deceit and deception, lies and liars, and dumps you into an inescapable pit of despair. The ending stays with you, and the more you think about it, the worse it gets until you’re curled up under the covers, telling yourself that it’s only fiction.

Happy? No.

The most well-written, absorbing, provocative book I’ve read in years? Yes.

Incubus. Read it, if you dare.

Aimer at Amazon

Monday

Photo by Tara Winstead on Pexels.com

As anyone who has ever dieted knows, Monday’s the day.

The day you kick a lifetime of bad habits out the door, and usher in the new and improved you.

The day you pop out of bed, hit the treadmill and the shower, and get it together…all of it, everything on that DIY improvement list in your head.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

The only problem with Monday is, there’s always another one coming along 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Post Covid: Scary

Now that the vaccines are out and about, and we’re impatiently awaiting the end of pandemic restrictions, have you put any thought into a post-Covid world, and what that might look like?

I’ve wondered if masks might become a permanent part of my wardrobe, if the Western handshake will be replaced by the Eastern bow, if my poor neglected passport will ever escape the drawer its imprisoned in, but that’s as far as it went.

Until today.

In the kitchen, baking cookies I had no business baking, I saw it—our post-Covid world.

You’ve seen it too, in all its HD clarity.

Touchstone Pictures 2009

It’s been awhile since 2009 so you might not remember, but the movie ends with people stumbling out of their houses, blinking in the daylight most of them haven’t seen in years. Unshaven, unwashed, wrapped in bathrobes, they’re lost in a world they’re no longer familiar with.

Scary?

OMG, Yes! Have you seen my robe?

FYI, the cookies came out pretty well 🙂

Aimer at Amazon