Sikh Saviours

A walk in the park—the very expression means easy.

Just not in this park…

B.C. Parks

Golden Ears Provincial Park in B.C. isn’t a Sunday stroll and ice cream kind of place. It’s 555 square kilometres of serious nature—and bears.

If you hike the trails at Golden Ears, keep your eyes open, and watch your step. You can’t count on being rescued by a group of international students who unwind and tie their turbans together to make a ten metre rope—or can you?

This past Tuesday, Ajay Kumar, Arvindjeet Singh, Gagandeep Singh, Kuljinder Singh and Gurpreet Singh received commendations from the RCMP and the cities of Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows. RCMP Supt. Wendy Mehat, an officer for twenty-one years and a Sikh herself, presented the young men with a commemorative coin and a community leader award for their quick thinking and ingenuity.

CBC

Rick Laing, Ridge Meadows Search and Rescue manager, arrived on scene to find the young Sikhs had done his job for him. “I’ve never seen or heard of anything like this. Ingenious.” Laing declared the rescued man “extremely lucky” that the Sikh group of hikers happened by when they did. “At least one person slips on the rocks and drowns in this area every year.”

Who knew that a religious symbol could be more than a symbol?

All Golden Ears Park images: shutterstock.com

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Pandemic Art

If you’re traipsing down the sidewalk in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan be careful where you walk. You don’t want to smudge the art.

Nikki Sirett

A recent transplant from Vancouver, Nikki Sirett got to know her new home this past summer—one chalk drawing at a time.

Nikki Sirett

What started as a pandemic escape and a way to use up old art supplies has brought colour to Saskatoon’s streets and put smiles on Covid-weary faces.

Creating chalk designs that won’t last past the first raindrop may seem like a waste of the artist’s talent, but Nikki finds it freeing. “Hey, I’m giving myself two hours, let’s see how big I can make this cat, and how colourful. If it doesn’t look perfect, it doesn’t matter—it’s just going to be gone anyway.”

While Nikki usually draws dogs and cats, she occasionally dabbles in less domestic animals like this vibrant fox…

Nikki Sirett

“People love it, which has been super fun,” Nikki’s happy to report. “Kids will stop and be like, ‘Oh my God, that’s such a cute dog. It’s just the best thing ever to make a kid happy.”

Nikki”s gift of whimsy brings out the kid in all of us 🙂

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Superman: Son of Kal-El

Jon Kent’s a lot like his father, the original man of steel, Clark Kent. Same dark hair, rock-hard jaw, and penchant for saving the world.

heroichollywood.com

Jon’s got the speed, the strength, the x-ray vision, and the girl.

Uh, no. Not the girl.

Jon’s got a guy. Or, he will have…

cbr.com

In the upcoming, November 9th issue of Superman: Son of Kal-El, Jon starts a romantic relationship with reporter, Jay Nakamura.

If you’re wondering where Jon falls on the queer spectrum, the DC comic-book superhero has been tagged with the bisexual label.

Jim Lee, DC’s chief creative officer and publisher, says, “We couldn’t be prouder to tell this important story.” I’m sure he is, but I’m guessing he knows how well the Japanese Yaoi comic books sell.

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8 Lessons Learned from Covid

Photo by Nandhu Kumar on Pexels.com

In her post on Toxic Productivity over at Mental Health @ Home, Ashley calls bullshit on the idea that being productive is a more worthy goal than just kicking back and living your life. That if you aren’t emerging from Covid with a new skill or accomplishment under your belt, you’re a complete waste of space.

Which got me thinking…

Have I been hibernating through Covid, letting the days and months flow into time I’ll never get back? Have I learned anything since that first lockdown in March of 2020?

Yes.

I’ve learned that…

  • I don’t like Zoom.
  • Hanging out in your robe makes your clothes shrink.
  • Adding white chocolate and butterscotch chips to anything makes it better.
  • Running errands is an outing, not a chore.
  • Covid does not make Pringles any less fattening.
  • Masks are cheaper than facelifts.
  • You can’t have too many streaming services.
  • Being banned from planes, restaurants, and movie theatres isn’t the end of the world. It just feels like it.

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#National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

CBC.ca

Like Phyllis Webstad of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation, I had just turned six when I started school. I assume I was excited, probably a little nervous, but I don’t remember. Phyllis does.

She remembers showing up at her school, excited to be there, proud to be wearing the new orange shirt her grandmother had bought her. She remembers standing there with her classmates, all of them scared and crying as their clothes were stripped off them. She remembers never seeing her treasured orange shirt again.

In 2013, Phyllis’s experience inspired the inception of Orange Shirt Day. A day to recognize and raise awareness of the horrific history and legacy of the Residential School System.

teentalk.ca

This past Thursday, on September 30, Canada marked the first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. A day to remember the children lost, the families shattered. To reflect on the injustice that exists to this day. To find a way forward—together.

A way that includes sending people like Blake Desjarlais to Ottawa. Blake is Metís, speaks fluent Cree, and is the first two-spirit member of parliament.

A way that appreciates the talent of actors like Kiawenti:io Tarbell. An up-and-coming star at only 15, Kiawenti:io is Mohawk from the Akwesasne community in Ontario.

A way that applauds the magic in the voices of singers like Mary Nahwegahbow. An athlete and musician, Mary hails from the Whitefish River Nation 500 kilometres North of Toronto.

A way through the heartbreak of the past into a brighter future.

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