First World Problems

Embarrassing, but true. We all vent a bit about things that aren’t much more than minor annoyances. You know the type of thing: OMG, my Kindle died., or That freaking GPS took me to the wrong address., or my personal favourite, What? I have to pay for Wi-Fi on the the cruise?

I’ve been known to weep and moan when the internet goes down, but the award for Best In Class Whiner goes to my husband. He walks around the house, saying really rude things to our Google speaker.

Just between you and I… I don’t think Google likes him.

She answers his requests with a “Sorry, I can’t help you with that yet.” She refuses to let him add anything to our shopping list, telling him that she doesn’t recognize his voice.

To be fair to my husband, Google can be a bit of a princess. She’s moody and mercurial. Some days, she’ll accommodate him, be all sweetness and light. She’ll even let him add to his calendar. The next day, she won’t acknowledge his existence, telling him that she’s not authorized to answer his request.

Totally frustrating, true. Every second day, he’s in the Google Home App activating voice recognition—again. I sympathize…really.

I’m filled with admiration for his determination. He won’t admit defeat, won’t give up.

God forbid, he goes back to tapping appointments into his phone—gasp!—himself.

Me? I’m good with Google. She likes me.

Aimer at Amazon

In A Word…

There are words everywhere, coming at us from people, from screens, from little attachments we stick in our ears. Words we ignore, or not. Words we believe, or not.

With all the words bombarding us, what impact can one single word have?

Massive.

One word can make your day, change your mood, make you smile if it’s the right word. If it’s a word you understand.

Mike Landry, a Brampton, Ontario bus driver learned that word.

Satsriakaal.

It means Hello, in Punjabi. But it means a lot more to Mike’s passengers. It means acceptance, it means welcome, it means respect.

That one word was the beginning. Now, four years later, Mike has learned a lot more Punjabi from his passengers, and made a lot of friends. There’s a lot of laughter on Mike’s bus these days.

Be careful of the words you say,
Keep them short and sweet.
You never know, from day to day,
Which ones you’ll have to eat.”- Annonymous

Aimer at Amazon

Enough is Enough

It’s a slippery slope, one becomes two, becomes a collection, becomes … oh, my God, when did I buy all this stuff?

I’ve fallen a time or two myself so I understand the climb. It’s starts out innocently enough with one particular object or interest. One of my falls down that slippery slope began with a book, a biography of the actor, Montgomery Clift. Within a matter of months, I had collected every movie the man had ever made and had a drawer full of absolute necessities like a Montgomery Clift watch, cuff links, and license plate frame.

Fickle creature that I am, eventually I abandoned Monty and moved on, but some collectors are more faithful than I.

Andrea Katelnikoff has been collecting Barbies since 1988. At last count, she had over 3,000 dolls, all stored and displayed on the second floor addition to her house purpose built for the dolls.

Andrea

Collectors don’t subscribe to the philosophy that less is more, but when, I’m wondering, is enough enough?

Aimer at Amazon