Care

Some days, the news racing across our screens is all bad and the world seems a dark place. Depressing, scary even, but what can we do?

Caught up in the busyness that is our lives, carrying around our own bag of problems, what can any of us do?

Maybe …

Something simple, something small, some one thing that makes a difference to one person.

Hanna Hoswell and Kate Hanafy, paramedics with the Queensland Ambulance Service in Australia, thought to do that one thing that would made a difference to Ron McCartney.

After fighting a seventeen year battle against prostate cancer, Ron was heading back to the hospital for the last time. Hanna and Kate, when told that Ron hadn’t been able to eat anything for two days asked him if he could eat anything right then, what would it be?

His answer: A Caramel Sundae.

En route to the hospital, the paramedics stopped at a McDonald’s and got Ron his sundae.

Ron (2)Picture courtesy of Danielle Smith/Facebook

A small thing, a caring thing —

That sundae was the last thing Ron ate before he passed away.

Aimer at Amazon

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Home Away From Home

When you’ve seen enough museums, castles, and churches. When your feet are killing you and you can’t access Google Maps because the battery on your phone has died. When the clouds open up and you left your umbrella in the hotel…

Tourist Overload.

The cure?

Something familiar. Some place that’s just like home.

Don’t think I don’t see the irony here.

We pack our bags and hit the road because we want to see new, different, other — and then all we want is the same old, same old.

Why?

Because being a stranger in a strange land is exhausting. Also interesting, exciting, and amazing, but it fries the brain.

For most North Americans, that little bit of home is a Starbucks or if we’re really desperate a McDonald’s. For Canadians though, nothing says home like Tim’s.

In Belfast, a block or two away from their incredibly beautiful city hall … could it be? Nah. No way, not here.

But, yes. There it was, as Canadian as the Maple Leaf — Tim Hortons in Northern Ireland.

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Did I go in?

Two words for you — French Vanilla 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

 

Welcome Home

No one says Welcome Home anymore.

In my house, I’m lucky if anyone turns away from the TV for a whole two seconds and tosses a Hi in my direction. No one actually gets up and comes to the door. Basically, I got more enthusiastic welcomes from the dog, but he’s moved out.

Banners say Welcome Home, but unless you’ve been stuck in the hospital for a month or carried a gun somewhere overseas don’t expect anyone to string one up for you anytime soon.

Has this lack of an anachronistic pleasantry darkened my days and ruined my nights? No. I never even thought about it, much less rued its absence, until…

On my way home recently, I asked Google to talk me through the traffic and ever-present construction. Eventually, I pulled into my driveway. My phone said…

Welcome Home.

LOL, literally. Huge smile on my face.

I considered driving around the block just to come back and hear that automated welcome again because—seriously cute.

Who needs people when your phone likes you?  🙂

Aimer at Amazon

 

 

Boys in the Band

Way back when I was in high school, the movie Boys in the Band sparked by an Off Broadway play, was one of my first introductions into what life in the LGBT community was like. Not that we used or even knew the term LGBT etc. etc. back then.

To the fifteen-year-old I was at the time, the movie seemed dark and depressing, the characters miserable.

Fast forward almost fifty years and we have Boys in the Band on Broadway. The characters are still deeply troubled men but — I’m not fifteen anymore.

I know no one is happy with themselves 24/7, that we all deal with voices from our past that make us cringe, and that this snapshot of gay life isn’t the only picture possible.

This isn’t 1970 and things have changed — which I think is the point of this revival.

Plus, and this is what made me pull out my credit card, have you seen the cast?

Jim Parsons would be enough to get me in a seat at the Booth Theatre on his own, but he’s not on his own. Sharing the stage we have, the new and improved Mr. Spock, Zachary Quinto, the original Elder Price from the Book of Mormon, Andrew Rannells, and my personal favourite since he played a not-so-recovered thief in White Collar, Matt Bomer. The only reason there isn’t a string of exclamation marks behind Matt’s name is because I’m restraining myself 🙂

Boys

If you’re anywhere near New York in the near future, plunk yourself down in the Booth Theatre. Each and every one of these actors gives a stellar performance and there are a lot more laughs than I remembered 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

 

 

Upstairs Downstairs

The behemoth of a doorman nodded his recognition of Ethan and stepped back, allowing Ethan to enter the foyer.  Before him, two staircases, one spiralling down, the other spiralling up.

Ethan took the one that went down. He always took the one that went down.

On the lower level, Ethan bypassed the cloakroom. Most of the men here would be naked or close to it, reason enough to keep his clothes on. Ethan wasn’t one to follow the herd. Also, of course, he preferred a partner with a little imagination. Made for more interesting play.

In another incarnation, the room Ethan let himself into had been a library. The books were long gone, but the room itself remained unchanged. Built on two levels, the circular space supported a gallery that ran the circumference of the room.

Most of them mostly naked, men chatted in pairs and small groups. An X-rated cocktail party minus the cocktails…and the clothes. None of the men looked up. Each and everyone of them pretended the gallery above them didn’t exist.

“Fucker,” Daniel said, joining Ethan. “You don’t even try.”
“Hey,” Ethan said, tapping his chest. “New shirt.”
Daniel grinned, spread his arms open. “No shirt.”
No pants either, Daniel liked to put the goods on show.

Dressed or not, they were all on show. This was a goldfish bowl and they were the fish.
The fishermen stood on the gallery above them…watching, choosing their catch of the night.

A staff member, easily identified as such by his grey vest and black tie, spoke at Ethan’s ear. “Fourteen.”
No name, no description of the fisherman who had reeled him in, just a room number. All the information Ethan needed.

“Jesus,” Daniel said. “You just got here.”
“Must be the shirt,” Ethan said, with a smirk. “We still on for Saturday?”
“Tee off at 9:15.”

Barefoot and bare-chested, legs encased in faded denim, Ethan’s fisherman sat with his arms stretched out along the back of the couch. He stared at Ethan and his thin lips quirked into a half smile.

Ethan tracked a dark treasure trail down to a black belt, betting with himself as to which command would come first…strip or kneel.

“How do you feel about champagne?” Treasure Trail asked.
What?
“Sorry?”
Treasure Trail leaned to the side, plucked a glass off a side table and proceeded to drip champagne down his chest. “Thirsty?” He spread his legs, inviting Ethan to stand between them.

Game on.

Aimer at Amazon

Sign of the Times

I came across this sculpture today and I had to smile …

I remember a time when people talked about peace as if it would really happen. When both sexes wore their hair to their shoulders, the girls stopped wearing bras, and the boys all pretended they could play guitar.

The world was going to be a better place. We would make it better.

Yeah …

Created for the Toronto Light Festival last winter by Studio Rosenblatt, Symbolic Peace is a “laser cut steel sculpture meant to signify the strength of diversity within our community”.

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Maybe it’s time to bring back the 60’s  🙂

Aimer at Amazon