Happy Accidents

We’ve all experienced them. Your boyfriend dumps you just before your high school grad dance and you end up going with a friend’s ex who looks way better in a tux anyway, or you take the wrong turn off the highway and land at a truckstop to find the best breakfast you’ve ever eaten.

No? Maybe that’s just me, but…

Mistakes happen and every once in awhile life’s little glitches lead to a greater good. Just ask anyone in Olten, Switzerland.

A mishap with the ventilation system at the local Lindt factory blew a fine chocolate dust over the neighbourhood. Residents woke up to find chocolate snow. Now, that’s a mistake I could live with 🙂

In Toronto, a glitch on the LCBO’s website got Mohammed Asaduallah 24 bottles of red wine for—FREE.

Don’t all rush to your laptops, the glitch has been fixed, but Mohammed’s still smiling.

Happy accidents 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Is God Wrong?

Who’s to say? Don’t we all see God in our own way, or through the filter of our parents’ voices? What God—if he/she exists—thinks, is and always has been, a mystery.

We though, with all our human failings, are often wrong.

Even those of us who try to get it right. Even those of us who believe they hold God’s playbook in their hands, who think they know God’s mind.

Redeemer University, a private Christian university in Hamilton, Ontario, is an institution that believes it has the inside track on interpreting God’s intentions. Believes it with a conviction that promises disciplinary action against any student engaging in sexual activity outside a heterosexual marriage.

Same-sex marriage has been legal in Canada since 2005.

Do you see the problem here?

Redeemer is facing criticism from former students who take issue with the school’s edicts. LGBTQ students who walked the campus in guilt and fear. Questioning students who view the school’s policy as discriminatory.

Susan Ursel, a Toronto lawyer who represented the Canadian Bar Association against Trinity Western University on a similar issue, says Redeemer is discriminating against not only LGBTQ students, but any student who chooses to remain single.

Susan Ursel

“In a decent, multicultural, diverse society are there limits to what religion can do?” That, says Ursel, is the question before our courts today.

Is God wrong? Maybe not, but religions and religious institutions are another matter.

Aimer at Amazon

Making it Work

Here in my corner of the world, life is getting back to normal. The new normal that is, where everyone is expected to wear a mask and keep their distance.

Full disclosure: I have not done well with the lockdown. There have been an embarrassing number of days where I never bothered to get out of my robe. My treadmill is covered in dust, my WIP is still an idle thought, and I have eaten my weight in Oreo cookies.

Melva Cormier, a 92-year-old from Rustico, Prince Edward Island puts me to shame. Stuck at home during the pandemic, the great-great grandmother made productive use of her time knitting 60 pairs of hats and mitts for the newborns at Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Melva Cormier cbc.ca

And then, there’s Isaac Young, a 15-year-old from Arnprior, Ontario. Unable to find a summer job thanks to Covid-19, Isaac started his own business—Backyard Builder.

Isaac Young CTV News Ottawa

Isaac makes picnic tables, sandboxes, and garden planters. He’s thinking of branching out into toy boxes come the winter season.

Me?

I may dust off the treadmill…or not.

Aimer at Amazon

Boat-in?

Remember the joy of watching a movie through the space between the two front seats of the family car? Standing in line for popcorn with a bunch of kids wearing pajamas? Being envious of the people who were smart enough to bring lawn chairs?

Ah, the good old days. Gone, but not—say what?

Yes, drive-ins are back.

Covid-19 has accomplished the impossible, rewound the clock. With the Cineplexes shutdown and social distancing the new watchword, cinema lovers are heading out to the nearest field or empty parking lot.

Granted, the rules are a little different these days. You have to bring your own popcorn and don’t even think about getting out of your car. Still, you’ve got the mega screen in front of you, the starlit sky above, and your nearest and dearest in the car with you—bubble members only, please.

Don’t have a car? No problem.

“When in Rome…”

Or, in this case, Venice…

Who needs a car when you have a gondola?

Aimer at Amazon

From the Sea

I’d love to be one of those gifted people who seduce melodies from instruments, but I’m not.

Greg Fleming, a multi-talented musician from St. John’s, Newfoundland, is one of those people. He not only plays the electric guitar, he builds them.

With his Tidebreaker guitars, Greg has created something new—from something old.

Three hundred and fifty-nine years old, in fact.

Time, and tides, and history. Atlantic storms, and sailing ships, and one group of sailors who never got home.

A sunken ship, put together with “tree nails” instead of steel. Bits and pieces dredged off the ocean floor. Timbers carbon-dated to 1661.

Under the ocean for three hundred years, the salt-water infused wood inspired Greg to craft the Tidebreaker guitars, and gives them their unique sound.

“Every time,” says Greg, “I kind of get a little bit of chills when I realize I’m playing a shipwreck that was underwater for 300 years.”

Aimer at Amazon