Third Time’s the Charm

While I’m not a big believer in proverbs and folk wisdom, I hope the above saying is true.

After a year of bad and worse news, we could all use a little luck.

Heading into the third wave of Crippling Covid, and yet another lockdown here in Ontario, I have to say I’m feeling a little hopeless, and helpless, and tired.

Yes, the vaccines are rolling out, and the news broadcasts report light at the end of the tunnel, but I’m wondering …

When the storm is over, just how big and bright is that rainbow going to be?

Aimer at Amazon

Covid 2.0

Here we are, living the sequel to a movie we never wanted to be in.

Covid 2.0

Social distancing, masks, quarantines, lockdowns, not to mention the parents battling with online learning, the people forced into unemployment, the gruesome ICU statistics, and the ever present threat of contracting this nasty little virus.

Yeah, fun times. Now, imagine this…

Imagine living through a pandemic, not once, but twice.

Born in 1911, in Lauder, Manitoba, Jemima Westcott was seven years old when the Spanish Flu struck in 1918. There was no social distancing back then, no vaccine, and the schools stayed open. Jemima remembers having to douse her handkerchief in eucalyptus oil which was thought to be both a preventative and a cure. 55,000 Canadians lost their lives to that plague, but Jemima’s family and their farming community escaped the worst of it.

Last Sunday, on January 10th, Jemima celebrated her 110th birthday, making her Manitoba’s oldest resident and one of Canada’s supercentenarians.

Jemima with her granddaughter, Raunora. (submitted by Raunora Westcott)

A retired teacher, mother to five, and grandmother to fifteen, Jemima is once again waiting out a pandemic. To keep in touch with the family who can’t visit now, Jemima has learned to make video calls.

Jemima’s advice for a long life?

“Be yourself, and enjoy it.”

Aimer at Amazon

2020

In what may be the picture that best encapsulates the whole depressing year, @gregorycochrane gives us this haunting image of a dining dome floating in Lake Ontario…

@gregorycochrane

Until this pandemic invaded our lives, I’d never even heard of a dining dome. Sign of the times.

Bitter winds chased this particular plastic bubble into the November cold lake, where it danced above the grey, freezing waves and promptly sank beneath them.

This nightmare we call 2020 is sinking into the past, and with a vaccine on the horizon, here’s hoping for a better, safer 2021.

I’ll be taking a break this December, hunkering down in my robe, watching Netflix inside and the snow falling outside.

Happy Holidays. Happy New Year.

See you here in 2021, same Bat Time, same Bat Channel 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Where There’s a Will…

The Canada-U.S. border hasn’t been shut down since the War of 1812, but it’s shut now. Thank you, Covid-19.

This unprecedented closure put a serious dent in Kadee and Jaxson’s wedding plans. With Kadee’s family in Montana and Jaxson’s family in Alberta, there was no way both families could celebrate together—under one roof.

But who needs a roof?

Under a blue prairie sky, with their families on either side of the barbed-wire border line, Kadee and Jaxson tied the knot.

Where there’s a will—and some understanding border guards—there’s a way.

Aimer at Amazon

No Man is an Island…

Maybe not, but then, John Donne never lived through Covid-19. In 2020, we’re all bobbing corks in a sea of germs, desperately trying to steer clear of each other.

As the world pries open the prison doors, nothing looks the same as it did before…

Like this young woman at La Grande Motte in France, you may have to reserve your spot on the sand this summer.

Dining out? How do you feel about a romantic dinner for one?

At Bord För En, you have a Swedish meadow to yourself. The food comes to you on a pulley, no humans anywhere in sight. Rasmus Persson and Linda Karlsson’s restaurant, 350 kilometres from Stockholm, is a Coronavirus-free zone.

Sweden a little far for dinner? What about Virginia? Patrick O’Connell, chef and owner of The Inn at Little Washington has come up with an imaginative solution to the empty table syndrome social distancing rules demand—mannequins.

Okay, your fellow dinners are made out of fiberglass and plastic, but they’re quiet, and they’re not contagious 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Window Pane, Keep Me Sane.

In the space of a few weeks our priorities have changed. The small aggravations of daily life, the larger worries that used to keep us up at night, seem trivial now.

Stuck at home, staring at our screens and each other, we redefine important. Find the things that matter to us, that make this drag of days easier, that make us smile.

For the most part, these sanity savers aren’t new. They’ve been right there under our noses, visible but unseen, ignored in the hustle and bustle that used to be our lives. Only now, do they step onto centre stage, now that our world has shrunk to four walls.

Prior to the Covid lockdown, windows didn’t play a big role in my life. I walked past them without thought. Raised a blind in the morning, lowered it at night, and never stopped to look.

I look now.

Aimer at Amazon

Annie, Get Your Gun

While most of us are hunkering down, glued to the news or binge watching Netflix and Amazon Prime, trying not to get each other sick by practicing social distance and self-isolation, some of us are out there, braving the virus to protect our family.

How?

By buying guns and stocking up on ammunition. Makes sense, right? Shoot a bullet, kill a germ. Isn’t that what the experts at CDC are advising?

Gun stores are reporting a surge in sales and lines around the block.

Ringo H.W. Chiu/The Associated Press

Sorry, my mistake. This people aren’t arming themselves against the virus. They’re arming themselves against each other.

Ed Turner of Ed’s Public Safety in Stockbridge, Georgia attributes his increase in sales to Covid-19. “This is panic. This is ‘I won’t be able to protect my family from the hordes and the walking dead.'”

Asian Americans, worried about being blamed for the Coronavirus, are arming themselves. I’d like to say their fears are unfounded, but they’ve got televisions. They’ve heard the President speak.

Canadian gun and ammunition sales are also up, but that’s mostly due to the fact that 90% of the ammunition sold in Canada comes from the U.S. and hunters and target shooters here are concerned that the increased demand south of the border means a decrease in supply north of it.

It’s an ill wind…

Aimer at Amazon