#Set!

Photo by Gary Barnes on Pexels.com

Thanks to Covid, we’re all eating at home these days. Usually, in front of the television.

It’s only a memory now, but there was a time when we could invite people over for dinner. When we set the table with real plates not paper. When we bothered to set the table at all.

There’s an art to setting a table, to creating an atmosphere that says, “Welcome, enjoy, eat.” A creative component that has been celebrated in competitions at county fairs for decades.

Yes, competitive table-setting, or tablescaping, is a thing—who knew?

Scott Gawlik.

Toronto Star

The director of Set!, a tablescaping documentary that screened at Toronto’s Hot Docs Festival this year.

My table will never meet competitive standards—Judges frown on paper napkins and wrinkled tablecloths—and I’m good with that.

Who needs a little blue ribbon when you can have family sitting around the table, dripping sauce all over the tablecloth, and dropping food on the floor?

Aimer at Amazon

It Takes a Village

The old adage, It takes a village to raise a child, has never been more true than now.

Graeme and Simon Berney-Edwards of Redhill, Surrey, England are the proud fathers of two-year-old twins. They have the family they always wanted, but it wasn’t easy and they didn’t get there on their own.

Picture submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News.

The first step in their journey to fatherhood took them to an in vitro fertilization clinic in Las Vegas and eggs from an anonymous donor.

Step two had the couple looking to Canada for a surrogate, Canadian laws governing surrogacy being more progressive than those in the U.K.

Enter Meg Stone of Hamilton, Ontario. Meg was up for the challenge of carrying twins, half-siblings, one fathered by Graeme, one by Simon.

All in all, it took two women and two men across three countries to make the Berney-Edwards dream of a family come true.

Submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News

It takes a village 🙂

Aimer at Amazon