Human Rights

A simple phrase, the meaning fairly jumps out at you. No explanation necessary—or not.

In recent weeks, former employees have gone public with allegations of racism and homophobia levelled against the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

The museum’s mandate claims it is “centred around the idea that respect and understanding of human rights can serve as a positive force for change in the world.”

Understanding implies knowledge, and for two years from 2015 to 2017, the museum adopted a don’t ask, don’t tell policy when conducting certain tours. At the behest of some schools, the museum staff was told to excise specific exhibits from their guided tours.

I’d give you two guesses as to what those exhibits were, but you only need one—LGBTQ content.

Staff members were asked to steer the students away from any displays that mentioned diverse sexual orientation or gender identity. They were told to stand in front of a same-sex marriage exhibit blocking it from the students’ view.

That this conspiracy of silence was even considered, much less condoned for over two years at a museum purporting to encourage dialogue about human rights—all human rights—is disheartening. One more example of how far we still have to go as human beings.

Note: The CEO has resigned and the museum has issued an apology. They no longer adapt any of their education programs at the request of schools.

Aimer at Amazon