The Interview

He should have lied.

The minute Jared got a look at the man on the other side of the desk, he should have made up some excuse and got the hell out of there, but…

He had student loans to pay, and he was fed up with the short-term contract jobs, and he really needed to move out of his parents’ place —

“U of T,” Nicholas Allan Noyes, President and CEO said, reading from the resume in front of him. “Master of Arts in Ancient History.”

“Yes.”

Jared didn’t add a sir to the yes because this wasn’t the military, he wasn’t a freaking boy scout, and — bullshit. He didn’t say sir because, oh God, he so wanted to.

“Latin?” Noyes asked. “Bet that comes in handy.”

“Not so far.”

That got him a smile. Fortunately, it was there and gone in a nanosecond because Jared couldn’t think when Noyes smiled at him. He was having enough trouble concentrating even without the smile. Concentrating on anything, but the fact that there was something about this guy that just flat-out did it for him. Something? Hah! Make that everything. The air of command, the stone jaw… God, even his hands—

“I see you’ve moved around a bit since graduation,” Noyes said, tapping the resume.

“Yes, contract work mostly. I’d like to find a more permanent home.”

With you, Jared thought, but he didn’t say that. He wasn’t psychotic.

Noyes sat back in his high-backed, high-tech, black leather throne, Siberian blue eyes regarding Jared across the expanse of the polished slab of wood between them. “And what makes you think you’d be an asset to MicroSource?”

Jared trotted out his customary spiel, trying to sound intelligent when all he really wanted to know was what Noyes looked like under that bespoke suit and if he had a chance in hell of finding out …

Aimer at Amazon

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Because It’s Right

Life has gotten complicated. With new options come new questions… and new answers.

My daughter has two children, they both call her Daddy — because my daughter’s wife is Mommy.

Takes a bit of getting used to, doesn’t it?

From multi-generational, to nuclear, to blended, the concept of family continuously evolves, as we evolve.

Oftentimes, the law is slow to adapt to these changes, but in California this week they got it right.

Aidan Dvash-Banks, born in Canada to American and Israeli fathers, (Andrew and Elad Dvash-Banks) had been granted U.S. citizenship. His twin brother, Ethan Dvash-Banks had not.

At first glance, this doesn’t seem blatantly discriminatory, or it doesn’t if you don’t know much about citizenship law which I don’t. It seems logical that the biological son of the American gets citizenship status and the biological son of the Israeli doesn’t…

Yeah, no.

If Andrew had married a woman both boys would have been granted citizenship. The government failed to recognize the Dvash-Banks marriage as legitimate. They applied a born out of wedlock policy to the twin boys.

Fortunately, District Judge John F. Walter explained to the U. S. government where they had gone wrong.

Both boys have now been granted citizenship and the family is healthy, and happy, and living in L.A.

Boys

Family is about heart, some people know that 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Standing Guard

There’s a line in our national anthem…

O Canada, we stand on guard for thee

To my mind, those words aren’t about protecting our borders — they’re about protecting each other.

We are Canada.

All of us.

Unfortunately, we here in Ontario have been caught asleep at our posts. The conservative provincial government has rolled back sex education to where it stood in 1998.

They scrapped the sex ed program the liberals put in place in 2015 because apparently,  our kids don’t have to learn about consent, same-sex relationships, gender identity, online bullying or sexting.

Did I mention masturbation? 

No? Neither does Doug Ford’s 1998 retro program.

British Columbia, marching to the beat of different drummer, stands on guard for all its students.

Unlike Ontario, B.C. is not trying to turn the clock backward.  In 2016, they instituted SOGI — sexual orientation and gender identity program — with the goal of helping LGBTQ students and ending bullying based on gender identity.

Is the B.C. government getting flak from some parents and religious groups arguing that SOGI is “sexualizing our kids” and “telling them they are gender fluid”? Yes.

There were dueling rallies on the lawn of the legislature this past September, groups for and against SOGI shouting over each other.

Is the government backing down? No.

The province is committed to ensuring that every school is a safe space for all children.

The license plate says it all — Beautiful British Columbia.

Gay Pride In Canada Concept Image - Gay Pride Rainbow Flag And T

Aimer at Amazon

 

 

Upstairs Downstairs

The behemoth of a doorman nodded his recognition of Ethan and stepped back, allowing Ethan to enter the foyer.  Before him, two staircases, one spiralling down, the other spiralling up.

Ethan took the one that went down. He always took the one that went down.

On the lower level, Ethan bypassed the cloakroom. Most of the men here would be naked or close to it, reason enough to keep his clothes on. Ethan wasn’t one to follow the herd. Also, of course, he preferred a partner with a little imagination. Made for more interesting play.

In another incarnation, the room Ethan let himself into had been a library. The books were long gone, but the room itself remained unchanged. Built on two levels, the circular space supported a gallery that ran the circumference of the room.

Most of them mostly naked, men chatted in pairs and small groups. An X-rated cocktail party minus the cocktails…and the clothes. None of the men looked up. Each and everyone of them pretended the gallery above them didn’t exist.

“Fucker,” Daniel said, joining Ethan. “You don’t even try.”
“Hey,” Ethan said, tapping his chest. “New shirt.”
Daniel grinned, spread his arms open. “No shirt.”
No pants either, Daniel liked to put the goods on show.

Dressed or not, they were all on show. This was a goldfish bowl and they were the fish.
The fishermen stood on the gallery above them…watching, choosing their catch of the night.

A staff member, easily identified as such by his grey vest and black tie, spoke at Ethan’s ear. “Fourteen.”
No name, no description of the fisherman who had reeled him in, just a room number. All the information Ethan needed.

“Jesus,” Daniel said. “You just got here.”
“Must be the shirt,” Ethan said, with a smirk. “We still on for Saturday?”
“Tee off at 9:15.”

Barefoot and bare-chested, legs encased in faded denim, Ethan’s fisherman sat with his arms stretched out along the back of the couch. He stared at Ethan and his thin lips quirked into a half smile.

Ethan tracked a dark treasure trail down to a black belt, betting with himself as to which command would come first…strip or kneel.

“How do you feel about champagne?” Treasure Trail asked.
What?
“Sorry?”
Treasure Trail leaned to the side, plucked a glass off a side table and proceeded to drip champagne down his chest. “Thirsty?” He spread his legs, inviting Ethan to stand between them.

Game on.

Aimer at Amazon

Pride

For Pride this year, we have our first ever LGBTQ2 themed Heritage Minute.

For all you non-Canadians, Heritage Minutes are sixty second films that document significant people and events in Canadian history.  Often, moments and viewpoints are explored in these mini-movies that our high school history books failed to mention.

Case in point: Gay activist, Jim Egan.

Never heard of him? Neither had I.

Today, James Egan would be called a gay activist. Back in 1951, when he first sat down at his typewriter and pounded out an article entitled, I Am a Homosexual he was just a young man who was pissed.

Jim battled rampant homophobia with letters and op-ed pieces in the press, eventually taking the Government of Canada to court demanding spousal benefits for his life partner.

In 1995, Jim and his partner Jack Nesbit cruised down Yonge Street, the same street they could have once been arrested on for simply holding hands, as honorary grand marshals in the Toronto Pride parade.

Happy Pride 🙂

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Conversion Therapy

It was a mistake.

I knew any book set in an abandoned mental asylum was going to be too dark for me. I knew it, and I read the damn thing anyway.

Tin Box

Not that The Tin Box by Kim Fielding isn’t a good book. It is.

Fielding tells a story of two Williams — One arrested and consigned to a mental hospital in the 40’s for homosexual activity, the other trying to recover from religious parents and conversion therapy circa 2012.

I finished the book and thought I was okay … until I tried to sleep that night. Impossible. I kept thinking of that poor 1940’s William. I told myself it was fiction, fiction!

Fiction? Well … Yes, and no.

True, Fielding’s Williams are fictional characters, but what happens to them in the book has happened — and is still happening to LGBTQ people today.

In one of those freaky, maybe-there-is-a-Master-of-the-Universe coincidences, I opened my phone the next morning to find an email asking me to sign a petition to End Gay Conversion Therapy in Canada.

?????

Disgusting, but true. 2018 and Conversion Therapy isn’t banned nation wide. So far, only two provinces have declared CT illegal. Thank God, I live in one of them.

Really? What is wrong with this world?

How hard is it to say you be you and I’ll be me?

Aimer at Amazon

 

 

Hello, Straight People;

You don’t exist.

Yeah, yeah, I know. You think you’re straight. You know you’re straight. You can prove you’re straight, just ask anyone in your contact list, or text your current partner, or check out your Instagram account.

Hey, you don’t have to prove anything to me. I don’t care one way or the other and — and neither should you.

Sexuality isn’t one or the other. It’s a complex, complicated, driven by external stimuli and internal interpretation, everything-but-the-kitchen-sink kind of thing.

Who says 100% straight doesn’t exist? That would be Ritch C. Savin-Williams, Director of the Sex and Gender Lab at Cornell University.

In an effort to get at the core of who people really are, as opposed to who they have been socialized to say they are, Savin-Williams conducted a study using pupil dilation to monitor arousal.

You, me, the guy with the laptop hogging the best seat at your local Starbucks; none of us can control our pupil dilation. Can’t be done. Can’t be faked, but it can be measured.

Results? No matter how a person self-identified their eyes dilated when they were shown sexual images of both genders.

A little more dilation here, a little less dilation there, but still a definite physiological response.

Conclusion? Sexuality is not binary, it’s a continuum.

Sorry, you’re only mostly straight 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

A Slow March Forward

According to a recent U.N. report, there is a global trend towards decriminalization of same-sex relations. Twenty-five countries in the last twenty years have repealed laws banning consensual gay sex. Five of them in the last five years.

Good news, yes … but …

France legalized homosexuality in 1791. 1791 ! Two hundred and twenty-six years ago. This is not a new idea, people. And yet, here we are in 2017 and there are still seventy-three nations where same-sex relations are illegal. Really?

Are we stubborn or stupid or both?  Yes.

It took the suffrage movement 118 years to work its way across the globe. From New Zealand, the first country to give women the vote in 1893, to Saudi Arabia where women were allowed to vote for the first time in 2011.

Homo Sapiens: We might walk on two feet, but we crawl toward equality — each and every time.

Aimer at Amazon