Family Pride

Too freaking hot. Too many people. Glen much preferred to watch Pride from the comfort of his living room. He was too old for—Hello, someone’s been working out. Glen eyed the young man shouting into a microphone atop the float rolling down Yonge Street. Nice. When was the last time your abs looked like that, huh? Never.

He wouldn’t be standing shoulder-to-shoulder with half of Toronto if it wasn’t for his nephew. No, not fair, this wasn’t Tony’s idea. This was his sister’s fault. Blasted Type A personality. When Tony came out a few months back, Karen couldn’t leave it at we-love-you, use-a-condom. Nope, she had to join PFLAG, and volunteer with EGALE, and drag the whole family down to Pride. Overkill.

Not that he didn’t support his nephew, he did, but Tony didn’t need his family here. Somewhere between the parking lot and Yonge Street, he’d disappeared into a gang of his friends and more power to him. Glen wouldn’t mind ducking into the nearest pub for something cold himself. Beer on his mind, he tried to wedge himself out of the crowd and stepped back—onto someone else. “Sorry.”

“No problem.” The guy moved back, clearing a few inches for Glen. “Bit tight in here.”

“Yeah.” Glen shifted to the side, but the crowd surged forward and he found himself chest to chest with the stranger he’d stepped on. Green eyes bracketed by age lines, sunglasses set atop waves of grey hair. Lucky bastard. Glen was not okay with his own shrinking hairline.

“Had enough?” The grey head nodded at the crowd.

“Too old for this.” Glenn winnowed his way through the glut of bodies, aware of the stranger at his back.

“Me too,” Grey Mop said, as they reached the relative quiet of a store front. “Only came to support my son.”

“Nephew. Married?”

“Divorced.”

“Beer?”

“Hell, yes.”

Too old for Pride? Maybe not.

Pride Pen Pals

Gay Pride in Canada Concept Image

June is right around the corner and with Covid-19 still a menacing presence, Pride will look very different this year. Goodbye to a million people crowding the sidewalks of Toronto and hello to celebrating in place, just you, your tablet, and Zoom.

Digital doesn’t sound appealing?

Looking for a more personal touch?

Buddies in Bad Times, Toronto’s queer theatre, suggests going old school this year.

Remember letters, envelopes, stamps? Actual writing, you know, with a pen? Buddies has set up a program, Pride Pen Pals, where queer folks can connect with each other through snail mail, share their experiences around Pride.

I think Buddies has something here, not that I don’t appreciate the digital world, but there is something about opening an envelope, pulling out sheets of paper that are handwritten…

Now that I think about it, I can’t remember the last time I received a real letter, opened an envelope that didn’t hide a bill.

Can you?

Aimer at Amazon

Pride

As Toronto gears up for the Pride parade this weekend, I’ve been hearing a lot about a group who feel left out, overlooked. Apparently, these people have been victimized by those of us who strive for an inclusive society with equality for all.

They’re asking for their own parade, calling it STRAIGHT PRIDE. How they can even say the words with a straight face is beyond me!

Not that I’m surprised, we’ve heard this kind of garbage before, white men complaining about how rough they have it because minorities and women are getting all the good jobs. Please! Pass the hat, let’s help these poor souls out.

There are a lot of comments out there on the request for a Straight Pride parade in Boston. Here’s one of my favourites:

Will a Straight Pride parade ever happen? I’m thinking not, but the fact that some people think it should… There are still a few holdouts who believe the earth is flat, doesn’t make them right.

Aimer at Amazon

Pride

For Pride this year, we have our first ever LGBTQ2 themed Heritage Minute.

For all you non-Canadians, Heritage Minutes are sixty second films that document significant people and events in Canadian history.  Often, moments and viewpoints are explored in these mini-movies that our high school history books failed to mention.

Case in point: Gay activist, Jim Egan.

Never heard of him? Neither had I.

Today, James Egan would be called a gay activist. Back in 1951, when he first sat down at his typewriter and pounded out an article entitled, I Am a Homosexual he was just a young man who was pissed.

Jim battled rampant homophobia with letters and op-ed pieces in the press, eventually taking the Government of Canada to court demanding spousal benefits for his life partner.

In 1995, Jim and his partner Jack Nesbit cruised down Yonge Street, the same street they could have once been arrested on for simply holding hands, as honorary grand marshals in the Toronto Pride parade.

Happy Pride 🙂

Aimer at Amazon