Making it Work

Here in my corner of the world, life is getting back to normal. The new normal that is, where everyone is expected to wear a mask and keep their distance.

Full disclosure: I have not done well with the lockdown. There have been an embarrassing number of days where I never bothered to get out of my robe. My treadmill is covered in dust, my WIP is still an idle thought, and I have eaten my weight in Oreo cookies.

Melva Cormier, a 92-year-old from Rustico, Prince Edward Island puts me to shame. Stuck at home during the pandemic, the great-great grandmother made productive use of her time knitting 60 pairs of hats and mitts for the newborns at Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Melva Cormier cbc.ca

And then, there’s Isaac Young, a 15-year-old from Arnprior, Ontario. Unable to find a summer job thanks to Covid-19, Isaac started his own business—Backyard Builder.

Isaac Young CTV News Ottawa

Isaac makes picnic tables, sandboxes, and garden planters. He’s thinking of branching out into toy boxes come the winter season.

Me?

I may dust off the treadmill…or not.

Aimer at Amazon

Summer Sport

Prince Edward Island, home of red-sand beaches, lighthouses and lobsters is embracing the different with a new competitive spectator sport — Lobster Trap Stacking.

Huh?

Competitors carry 15 lobster traps that weigh 41 kilograms (90 pounds) for a distance of nine metres (30 feet) and stack them five tiers high.

lobster-traps-on-p-e-iAll competitors must supply their own gloves and safety boots. The winner is chosen based on speed and the neatness of their stacking. Top prize is  $1,000.

Personally, my idea of a summer spectator sport is sitting at an outdoor cafe, sipping a latte and watching all the beautiful people that seem to emerge with the sunshine, but …

If you happen to be in P.E.I. on July 12th this summer, stop by the Summerside Lobster Carnival and cheer on the trappers 🙂

Aimer at Amazon