To Keep or Not to Keep…

Perhaps a better question would be to buy or not to buy? If I’d posed that puzzler to myself oh, say, anytime over the last thirty years I wouldn’t be lost in a labyrinth of packing boxes now.

How much crap can you collect in three decades? Way too f***ing much.

Have you ever noticed that what you consider a prized possession given enough time becomes junk? Or is that just me?

We’re two weeks from D-Day and I’m still walking around the house, picking up random stuff, and asking myself if I need this in the new house?

Answer: I didn’t need it in this house.

What I buy and what I need are two totally different animals. Impulsive? Guilty. You’re talking to a woman who’s gone into a toy store with her grandchildren and come out with a stuffed animal for herself. More than once.

To be fair, I did buy the kids something too 🙂

Lesson learned, right? No cluttering up the new place. Less is more.

I wish 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

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Tummy Tuck for Lassie

Actually, the prospective surgical patient is called Mercedes. And yes, she’s going under the knife.

Mercedes hasn’t had it easy. Adopted by a street vendor in Bangkok after being abandoned by the driver of a Mercedes Benz car—hence the name—she then lost her second home when her new owner died.

The local vendors took to feeding her, which sounds like a great idea, except they didn’t know when to stop— and neither, of course, did Mercedes.

She gained so much weight, she couldn’t walk. Her helpful friends, apparently missing the big picture, then brought the food to her.

Mercedes eventually found her way to a foster home where she lost 27 kilos, half her weight, but the resulting excess skin caused bladder issues.

Enter Geneviève Smith who raised the money to bring Mercedes to Canada and a vet in Ottawa who will perform the surgery. Dacey Traill, a volunteer who’s had her own weight problems, is taking care of Mercedes until she’s ready for her tummy tuck. These days Mercedes is learning to love the outdoors and going for walks. Something she hasn’t been able to do for years.

Tomorrow morning when the alarm goes off, and I have to crawl out of bed to make my Weight Watchers meeting… Totally worth it 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

It Takes a Village

The old adage, It takes a village to raise a child, has never been more true than now.

Graeme and Simon Berney-Edwards of Redhill, Surrey, England are the proud fathers of two-year-old twins. They have the family they always wanted, but it wasn’t easy and they didn’t get there on their own.

Picture submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News.

The first step in their journey to fatherhood took them to an in vitro fertilization clinic in Las Vegas and eggs from an anonymous donor.

Step two had the couple looking to Canada for a surrogate, Canadian laws governing surrogacy being more progressive than those in the U.K.

Enter Meg Stone of Hamilton, Ontario. Meg was up for the challenge of carrying twins, half-siblings, one fathered by Graeme, one by Simon.

All in all, it took two women and two men across three countries to make the Berney-Edwards dream of a family come true.

Submitted by Simon Berney-Edwards to CBC News

It takes a village 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Pigment Light

Raccoons: Masked creatures who lurk around your house waiting for a chance to take the lid off your garbage can. Easily recognizable for their prison stripes— or not.

One out of every ten thousand raccoons is born with a genetic mutation that strips them of their black and grey signature colouring. Your chance of seeing an albino raccoon in the wild is about the same as being struck by lightning, 1 in 750,000.

Martin Ouellette is luckier than most, he not only saw one albino raccoon, he saw two— in his backyard.

Martin Quellette/Churchwood Pictures

Ouellette, watching the family of critters who’ve developed a liking for his oak tree, noticed that the regulation-coloured raccoons are protective of their lighter skinned brethren.

Protective, as if they know their lighter-skinned brethren can’t hide as easily as they can. Protective, as if they don’t care about a little pigmentation, or lack thereof.

Shameful, and sad, but often true, animals are more humane than we are.

Aimer at Amazon

Well Heeled

Historically, if you could afford to repair or replace your shoes, you were doing okay. Well heeled became synonymous with affluent. It’s not an expression we hear much anymore. Probably because most of us, at least on this side of ocean, spend our days in high tech running shoes whether we actually work out or not. Europeans, I notice, manage to do casual without looking like they just left the gym, but I digress…

In Saskatoon, Saskatchewan where the average house sells for $400,000, what makes a home worth $4.6 million?

The open concept 4700 square feet of living space? Possibly.

The spa, games room, home gym? Could be.

What about the magnificent view of the University Bridge spanning the South Saskatchewan River? Enticing, but…

Personally, I think the house’s hefty price tag has a lot to do with the bathtub.

Yeah, I hear you. A tub, is a tub, is a tub… Not so. Not in this case.

What kind of cash would you plunk down for a house that comes with a tub shaped like a shoe?

Well heeled 🙂

Aimer at Amazon

Pride

As Toronto gears up for the Pride parade this weekend, I’ve been hearing a lot about a group who feel left out, overlooked. Apparently, these people have been victimized by those of us who strive for an inclusive society with equality for all.

They’re asking for their own parade, calling it STRAIGHT PRIDE. How they can even say the words with a straight face is beyond me!

Not that I’m surprised, we’ve heard this kind of garbage before, white men complaining about how rough they have it because minorities and women are getting all the good jobs. Please! Pass the hat, let’s help these poor souls out.

There are a lot of comments out there on the request for a Straight Pride parade in Boston. Here’s one of my favourites:

Will a Straight Pride parade ever happen? I’m thinking not, but the fact that some people think it should… There are still a few holdouts who believe the earth is flat, doesn’t make them right.

Aimer at Amazon

First World Problems

Embarrassing, but true. We all vent a bit about things that aren’t much more than minor annoyances. You know the type of thing: OMG, my Kindle died., or That freaking GPS took me to the wrong address., or my personal favourite, What? I have to pay for Wi-Fi on the the cruise?

I’ve been known to weep and moan when the internet goes down, but the award for Best In Class Whiner goes to my husband. He walks around the house, saying really rude things to our Google speaker.

Just between you and I… I don’t think Google likes him.

She answers his requests with a “Sorry, I can’t help you with that yet.” She refuses to let him add anything to our shopping list, telling him that she doesn’t recognize his voice.

To be fair to my husband, Google can be a bit of a princess. She’s moody and mercurial. Some days, she’ll accommodate him, be all sweetness and light. She’ll even let him add to his calendar. The next day, she won’t acknowledge his existence, telling him that she’s not authorized to answer his request.

Totally frustrating, true. Every second day, he’s in the Google Home App activating voice recognition—again. I sympathize…really.

I’m filled with admiration for his determination. He won’t admit defeat, won’t give up.

God forbid, he goes back to tapping appointments into his phone—gasp!—himself.

Me? I’m good with Google. She likes me.

Aimer at Amazon