Digital Books

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As a reader, I’m a fan.

Digital books free up space in your house and in your luggage. Plus, if you’re stuck in an airport, doctor’s office, or bath—reading on demand.

As an sometime author, I’m in trouble.

The best thing about digital books? Nothing is permanent. You can change the title, the cover, the whole damn book whenever you want.

The worst thing about digital books? Nothing is permanent. You can change…everything.

So, I did.

After tedious discussions with Grammarly, I tinkered with my vampire trilogy. The books are now as good as they’re ever going to be.

Which leaves my first book, the one I learnt on, the one I’ve already republished with a new cover, new title, and hopefully a better written story. I decided that Grammarly and I should turn a gimlet eye on Daniel Mine.

Big mistake.

Grammarly I can deal with; I’m used to her nitpicking. It’s time that’s the problem.

Things have changed since I first published the book in 2014. No one has a Garmin GPS hanging off their windshield anymore.

Time warp. Freaking annoying.

Aimer at Amazon

Blood Moon

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Done! Done! and Done!

From a spark of an idea to accomplished fact. The Blood Bond Trilogy—Completed.

Finally!

Proof that I didn’t spend all of Covid eating Oreos and binging on Netflix, the last book in my vampire series is now on Amazon—Blood Moon.

A vampire and a human walk into wine bar,

and walk out…

Together.

Forever and Always.

Did I mention that I’m never writing a book again? EVER.

Aimer at Amazon

To Write, Or Not To Write…

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I thought it was just me, but no, most writers procrastinate.

It’s not only common, it’s expected.

Professional authors, as opposed to amateurs with access to a laptop—uh, that would be me—have coping mechanisms. Things likes deadlines, agents, and editors who aren’t their relatives. People who smack them upside the head and say, “Get to work.”

My coping mechanisms are Netflix, computer games, and online shopping. Oh, and reading. Reading other people’s books, people who write better than I ever will.

Ah, you noticed that, did you? Fine, I don’t have coping mechanisms. I have a carefully curated selection of aiding and abetting mechanisms.

Full disclosure? Procrastination and I have always been embarrassingly intimate. Avoidance is pretty much part of my DNA, and definitely part of my writing style. Sometimes though, the why and when of it surprise me.

Olympic marathons of procrastination before I type the first word of a new book, mini-sprints at the start of each new chapter, these I understand. Comes with the territory when you don’t draft outlines. When you have no map to follow, and each chapter is a leap into the unknown.

Yesterday however, I hit a new level of avoidance. Two paragraphs into a new chapter, the trail emerged, breadcrumbs spreading out before me, and knew where I wanted to go—and I hit save. Walked away from my desk.

What? Why?

Procrastinating because an empty white page is daunting, that I understand. But procrastinating when the way forward lights up in front of you?

That’s a new low, even for me.

Aimer at Amazon